How Do You Build An Aesthetic Physique? And Do Supplements Work?

How Do You Build Muscle?

The human body consists of around 650 skeletal muscles which contract upon receiving impulses from the motor neurons; this stimulus is propagated by a part of the cell called the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Motor neurons are responsible for the contraction of your muscles. Your overall strength is partially dependant on your body’s ability to control muscle contraction.

Muscle growth does not occur during weightlifting, but rather when you are at rest after working out. Resistance training inevitably damages your skeletal muscle fibres. Muscle fibres are essentially very long cells that were originally made from many stem cells. These cells fused together in a chain to form muscle fibres during your development. You still have a pool of these stem cells as an adult. These adult stem cells, which are called satellite cells, fuse with the damaged fibre and become a new part of it. While doing so, they stimulate muscle hypotrophy (growth) by promoting an increase in the number of myofibrils – the basic contracting units of a muscle fibre. The increase in the total number of myofibrils results in a thicker muscle fibre capable of performing greater workloads without damage.

 

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Supplements that actually work!

Now  lets talk about Supplements; please be careful, as there are many supplements in the market have a very minimal effect regarding the building of muscles, however these supplements below WORK.

You can watch all the video below from Aesthetic Physique Training YouTube Channel.

Creatine

The First Supplement on any list is Creatine ! What is Creatine? and what are ADP & ATP! There is more to understand about Creatine that you think! Watch the Video below to find out:

Creatine has a limited lifespan in the cell and must be continually replaced. As muscle mass increases, our creatine need also increases, and to keep up to this, our body’s amino acid pool is drastically reduced because creatine is made from amino acids.

Find out more info on Why Should I Take Creatine? by watching the video below:

So now you know what is creatine and why should you take it! But Creatine comes in various forms; and because there’s a variety to choose from, people find it hard to decide which is best for them. Watch the video below to find out the Best Creatine

There are other supplements that work. Lets start with BCAA.

BCAAs is a name that represents Branched Chain Amino Acids. They are a group of three essential amino acids namely, Valine, Leucine and Isoleucine. As you already know, essential amino acids have to be obtained from our foods as they aren’t synthesized in the body.

Find out What Is BCAA? by watching the video below:

Now lets talk about Beta Alanine

Beta Alanine is present in dietary protein foods like beef, fish, chicken, milk, and it is non-essential amino acid.  When we take Beta-Alanine supplement, it binds with Histidine to form Carnosine. Carnosine is stored in the muscles where it acts as a strong intracellular buffer. Unlike Beta-Alanine and Histidine, Carnosine can’t enter into the skeletal muscle.

Watch the video below to find out more:

 

Now Citrulline and Nitrates

Citrulline Malate is simply a mixture of citrulline and malate. While citrulline is an amino acid not found in protein, malate is a more regular acid that is found in nature.  Citrulline and malate are intermediates of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and the Nitric Oxide cycles in aerobic metabolism.

In human bodies, Nitrates breakdown to form the nitrites which are circulated within our systems. Our bodies convert the stored nitrites into nitric oxide (NO) when needed. Physically active people can gain numerous benefits from elevated levels of NO in their system.

Watch both videos above to find out why you should more about Citrulline Malate & Nitrates!

Next Issue Weight Loss / Fat Loss

How does your body get rid of excess fat? The enzyme in your body that is primarily concerned with the oxidation of fats is called adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPk).

Watch the video below to find more information:

 

This is going to be an active blog. I will be updating this Blog in the future with more informative videos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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